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2015 09 30 : Neighborhood Plan

posted Oct 5, 2015, 6:47 AM by Jody Caldwell

After many years and a few false starts Deer Park has begun the process of creating its Neighborhood Plan. Members of the Deer Park Neighborhood Plan Advisory Group worked with Louisville Metro officials to choose a professional planning consultant to shepherd us through this process. EHI Consultants of Lexington, KY were awarded the contract, and the six month long process should start in late August – early September. As we move along updates and progress reports will be posted on the Deer Park Neighborhood Association Facebook and web pages. As  a resident and/or business owner in Deer Park, your input is vital to the success of this endeavor , and we look forward to hearing from you in the very near future!

 

Some Questions You May Have About Neighborhood Plans

 

What is a neighborhood plan?

A neighborhood plan is a guide for making future decisions about how Louisville Metro should allocate resources in Deer Park, what kinds of development activity is appropriate, and what issues Deer Park residents and property owners are concerned about.  It’s a statement of what the neighborhood wants to achieve and become, as well as a roadmap to reach those destinations.  Once completed, the Plan will be voted on by the full Metro Council and then become part of the Metro’s comprehensive development plan, Cornerstone 2020, in effect codifying this plan as the will and sense of the people of Deer Park.

 

What will a neighborhood plan do?

The neighborhood plan will identify and document the physical, social, and economic trends and conditions present in Deer Park, and will express a shared vision for the neighborhood’s future, developed through a public engagement process.  The plan will also identify goals and strategies that communicate the neighborhood’s intended direction to residents, decision-makers, service providers, and business leaders.

 

Will a neighborhood plan tell me or my neighbors what to do, or what not to do?

A carefully crafted plan will express the neighborhood’s goals, preferences, and priorities, but will leave flexibility to accommodate real world situations.  The plan is a policy document, not a regulatory one.  Louisville Metro’s zoning and other existing ordinances, combined with the full range of public services and resources form the mechanism for implementing the plan.

 

What if I disagree with what the plan says?

All stakeholders are urged to express their opinions throughout the planning process.  The more input received, the more accurately the plan can reflect the viewpoints of all affected parties.  Even if the final plan document is at odds with your personal vision, there may be opportunities to influence implementation of the plan, in ways that will be compatible with your preferences.

 

What will it take to develop a neighborhood plan for Deer Park?

Developing a successful neighborhood plan will take about 6 months and will require the engagement of many residents, property owners, and other stakeholders—including you.  The work of developing the plan will be conducted through a series of meetings, as well as the ongoing efforts of Louisville Metro and the consultant's staff to keep the process moving.  But this is only the beginning.  As the planning process unfolds, stakeholders will have opportunities to build partnerships and accumulate the social capital that can enable the neighborhood collectively to solve common problems.  Ultimately, the more responsibility residents and properties owners invest in developing the plan, the greater the benefits to the neighborhood will be.

 

Will a neighborhood plan solve our problems?

A neighborhood plan is a tool that the neighborhood and Louisville Metro administration can use to help improve conditions in Deer Park, but the real solutions are to be found in the level of dedication that you and your neighbors put into each other and the plan development and implementation processes.  Identifying, strengthening, and utilizing Deer Park’s existing assets and becoming effective at drawing on other resources will also be crucial parts of shaping the neighborhood’s future to benefit its residents and property owners.  The planning process and the resulting neighborhood plan can provide the structure and catalyst Deer Park needs to attain this future.

 

What if I don’t own property in Deer Park, just rent?

Anyone who has an interest in the future of the Deer Park neighborhood is a legitimate stakeholder in the planning process—your participation is important!

 

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